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The 15 Most Outrageous WWE Superstars of All Time

In a business where outrageousness is par for the course, a WWE Superstar really needs to raise the bar to stand out from the pack. These 15 Superstars did just that, in ways related to their in-ring style, what came out of their mouths and the overall impact their careers had (and are still having!) on WWE. Get ready, this is gonna be a little weird …

Mick Foley

“Outrageous cubed” might be the best way to describe this hardcore icon, considering he competed – and triumphed – as three different in-ring personalities.

Debuting as the sadistic Mankind in 1996, Foley took on the role of a malevolent outcast, concerned solely with the harm he inflicted on his opponents. To this day, hardcore highlight reels are cluttered with his bruises and broken bones. Through his evolution, Foley eventually transcended entire decades with his next iteration: Dude Love, a swingin’ ’70s do-gooder, clad in tie-dye and flanked by gorgeous women. And, lest the WWE Universe forget the persona that brought Foley to the dance, there’s Cactus Jack. As Jack, Foley made a name for himself in WCW before hitting the WWE scene, making sure to keep the essence of the Hardcore Original in his arsenal, just in case he needed to notch it up in the ring.

No matter the name, the ring attire or the catchphrase, Mick Foley truly exists beyond the bounds of normalcy – which is just the way he has always liked it.

Max Moon

If outrageous can be interpreted as “out of this world,” then Max Moon – WWE’s lunar luchador – is his own galaxy within the WWE Universe.

In fall 1992, WWE fans were treated to a close encounter with this spaceman-turned-Superstar, whose costume alone guaranteed his spot on this list. In addition to multi-colored dreadlocks, a robot-inspired mask and circuit board-styled chest plate, Max Moon also used a jetpack to … fly … up the ring steps and into the squared circle. From there, he would point to the crowd, and shoot fireworks from each of his futuristic-looking wrist gauntlets before competing and (usually) ending up staring back up at the moon for a three-count.

Unfortunately, Max Moon’s WWE tenure burned out long before Pluto got downgraded to “not a planet”; the not-so-interstellar Superstar was gone within a year, leaving behind him a trail of outrageous, neon space dust.

"Macho Man" Randy Savage

His outfits looked like confetti assembled, and his high-energy personality made Randy Savage WWE’s equivalent of a sugar rush. However, the “Macho Man’s” contributions to WWE were much, much greater than just being fun to look at.

Savage was one of WWE’s first high-flyers, showing the WWE Universe moves and in-ring aptitude unlike any of his predecessors. Not a single WWE fan – diehard or lapsed – hasn’t at some point affirmed a situation by resonating Macho Man’s trademark “OHHHHHH YEAH!” in their most gravel-pitched voice. And not a single WWE Superstar or Diva can say that he or she would be a part of the roster were it not for the over-the-top inspiration of Randy Savage.

Tragically, Savage passed away after a fatal automobile accident in 2011. However, his legend, his accomplishments, and his larger-than-life impact on WWE will forever ensure his outrageous immortality.

Papa Shango

In 1992, WWE was devoured by a ruthless cloud of black magic, conjured at the hands of the roster’s first witch doctor, the voodoo master known as Papa Shango.

With an abstract skull painted over his face, a necklace of bones and skulls encircling his heavily-inked neck, and loads of ceremonial attire and accouterment punctuating his ominous entrance, Papa Shango made even the most fearsome WWE Superstars skittish. Shango’s most notable target was Ultimate Warrior, who suffered the effects of his voodoo magic – including mysterious black oil dripping from Warrior’s face and Warrior’s inexplicable vomiting backstage.

Luckily for his opponents, Shango’s WWE tenure was relatively short-lived. The voodoo man disappeared as mysteriously as he debuted, but his outrageous legend lives on.

The Boogeyman

Billed from “The Bottomless Pit,” the 6-foot-2, 262-pound Boogeyman brought to life the childhood fears and anxieties of everyone who witnessed him in action.

With his trademark clock – a prop that he would viciously smash over his own head during his entrance – Boogeyman let every opponent know that their time was up. And when he was through dispatching them, the assault took a slimy, macabre turn as Boogeyman unleashed his other trademark: an unappetizing bevy of earthworms, chewed up and spit out, on top of his unconscious adversaries.

Before Boogeyman slunk back into the shadows for good, he left an indelible scar on the psyches of those who cowered under his outrageous brand of terror.

Jeff Hardy

Painted fingernails, a painted face and a career painted with gravity-defying, awe-inspiring charisma and reckless abandon.

Along with brother Matt, Jeff Hardy paid his dues by getting crushed week in and week out by WWE heavyweights during the mid-90s. Through the bumps and bruises, though, The Hardys learned how to succeed in WWE, going on to eventually become six-time World Tag Team Champions. Eventually, Jeff broke out as a singles megastar, with fans drawn to his truly unique aura and presence. He was often considered by many as weird, unstable, even crazy – but he was, without fail, always exciting.

Jeff’s career, much like his life, was lived on his own terms until his last day in WWE, when he was forced to retire after losing a career-ending match to CM Punk on SmackDown. Yet with a fan following beyond gigantic, it’s evident that he has forever painted himself as WWE’s most charismatic enigma – and one of its most successful. Yet with his legion of fans and the ability to collect even more World Titles, the WWE Universe will forever regard Jeff Hardy's career as a work of art.

Goldust

Reinventing himself at every turn, Goldust made sure that sports-entertainment would never forget his name. He debuted in WWE in October 1995, dressed as a live version of the Academy Award. As if his appearance wasn’t creepy enough, the cinephile stalked his opponents, subjecting them to a show of mind games never seen before (or since, for that matter).

Just ask former Intercontinental Champion Razor Ramon, who found himself the object of Goldust’s affection shortly after his debut. With love letters, romantic gifts (including his trademark platinum blond wig) and a Razor tattoo over his heart, Goldust successfully distracted WWE’s “Bad Guy” to the point he could not focus in their Intercontinental Title Match at the 1996 Royal Rumble, and lost to the Bizarre One.

Even Goldust’s interviews left the WWE Universe with shivers. Conducted under a bright spotlight, the segments featured suggestive one-liners from famous flicks that ensured an uncomfortable couple of minutes for WWE fans and Superstars alike. 

George "The Animal" Steele

Only one 75-year-old could chew up a baseball before tossing the ceremonial first pitch at a baseball game, and have it be considered par for the course. WWE Hall of Famer George Steele, who started his sports-entertainment career in 1967, lived up to his nickname “The Animal” by eating ring turnbuckle pads (much like a dog chewing a couch) and cutting mumble-filled pre-match rants.

Fellow Hall of Famer Buddy Rogers quickly learned of the enigma in 1983. Steele, a guest on “Rogers’ Corner,” obliviously sat in his chair with a lighter against his body, burning the hair on his chest. Rogers begged Freddie Blassie to control Steele, but eventually decided to end the interview before he had to find a fire marshal.

With his trademark green tongue, The Animal forever cemented his place in WWE lore – and on the bad side of whoever had to replace all those turnbuckle pads.

The Oddities

Kurrgan, standing at 6-foot-11, dressed in a tie-dye T-shirt and leather helmet. Golga, a 468-pounder, wore a mask and carried a stuffed Cartman. Giant Silva, scaling at 7-foot-4, had surprisingly fancy dance moves. Couple those three with Luna Vachon and the Insane Clown Posse, and you have one over-the-top faction.

The trio was not the swiftest in the ring, but they used their size and power to decimate the competition. At SummerSlam 1998, the faction took its sideshow to Madison Square Garden, rocking the New York City crowd in an impromptu pre-match dance party before making quick work of Kainetai.

No one will ever confuse The Oddities for the Four Horsemen – either for their ring work or their fashion cred – but the group certainly etched a following in the WWE Universe for celebrating its strange qualities.

Gorgeous George

At 5-foot-9, 215 pounds, Gorgeous George could not rely on his stature to intimidate his opponents. Instead, the WWE Hall of Famer chose to infuriate the fans. In fact, his feminine antics frustrated just about everyone in a way that few other Superstars can match.

George came to ringside in the most eloquent of robes on the heels of his escort Jeffries, who dropped rose petals along the red carpet and sprayed perfume in the ring. The “Gorgeous One” would pull bobby pins, which he called “Georgie pins,” from his platinum blond curls and throw them to the crowd, inciting plenty of boos. He refused to allow the referee to check his person for any foreign objects.

George’s flashy ways even inspired the likes of Muhammad Ali and James Brown, both outrageous personalities in their own right, and earned him nicknames like “The Toast of the Coast.”

Chris Jericho

His jacket lights up. He has worn a variety of hairstyles – both on his head and face. And, early in his career, he was once accompanied by a man dubbed “Jericoholic Ninja.” Even Jericho’s departures and returns to WWE are always shocking and well-orchestrated.

As a young cruiserweight in WCW, Jericho showed in-ring ability beyond much of the WCW roster. When he stormed into WWE Aug. 9, 1999 – interrupting The Rock with the culmination of his infamous countdown – he was given an even bigger platform to perform. And perform he did, becoming one of the most entertaining and decorated Superstars of all time, including the distinction of becoming WWE’s first-ever Undisputed Champion.

Chris Jericho remains one of WWE’s top Superstars in the ring and on the mic, which is why his 20-plus year career has yet to see a boring moment.

Legion of Doom

It’s the Halloween costume every young WWE fan in the ’90s wanted to wear: a pair of red, blue or silver spiked shoulder pads and matching face paint. Hawk and Animal, or The Legion of Doom, were an imposing tandem obsessed with hurting people – and they never shied from making this point known in their interviews.

The bruisers always found a way to top the insane ovations and spectacle of their entrance, though. At SummerSlam 1992, the duo and manager Paul Ellering drove to ringside on motorcycles as the crowd of more than 80,000 went wild in London’s Wembley Stadium. The entrance was the first of its kind in WWE, and has often been duplicated since.

Hawk and Animal admitted in a handful of backstage promos that they left their sanity in Chicago. Yet it’s exactly this crazy personality and bruising attitude that made LOD so outrageously popular.  

Ultimate Warrior

He would often speak (or scream) in riddles and parables. Every sentence he uttered ended in an exclamation point. His interviews led into elaborate, graphic metaphors about coming from “the heavens” to lead the Warriors. His attire consisted of bright-colored trunks and singlets, iconic face paint and tassels. Yes, Ultimate Warrior was truly hard to forget.

His interview at WrestleMania VI encapsulates Warrior’s outrageousness perfectly. Leading into his Champion vs. Champion Match against Hulk Hogan, Warrior went on a convoluted rant about Hulkamania being an airplane that he was going to send into a nosedive. It was a typical promo for the man from “Parks Unknown.” Though his interviews may have left fans scratching their heads, they were always memorable.   

As if his appearance and interviews weren’t over-the-top enough, Ultimate Warrior even legally changed his name to “Warrior” in 1993. 

Giant Gonzalez

In 1993, no one could stop The Undertaker – but this 8-foot behemoth tried … and actually came pretty close.

Gonzalez wore a skin-toned body suit, decorated with airbrushed muscles – presumably because there weren’t any underneath. What he lacked in wrestling ability, looks and charisma, though, he made up for in size and villainy. He cost Undertaker a Royal Rumble victory in 1993, and handed The Deadman his only asterisk-marked victory at WrestleMania, when he used chloroform to subdue The Phenom and earn his own disqualification.

Giant Gonzalez was gone from WWE by year’s end, presumably back up the beanstalk from which he debuted, but he remains one of WWE’s most outrageous monsters.

"Rowdy" Roddy Piper

He dared to smash a coconut over the head of proud Fijian and WWE Hall of Famer, "Superfly" Jimmy Snuka. Long before moviegoers ever heard of William Wallace, he initiated a "Braveheart"-esque attack against Bad News Brown at WrestleMania VI. That was "Rowdy" Roddy Piper being "Rowdy" Roddy Piper — never afraid to obliterate the lines of good taste for the sake of entertaining fans and rattling opponents.

From his controversial “Piper’s Pit” talk show to his wild, nonsensical promos, Piper’s envelope-pushing impact on WWE is legendary. If the Hot Rod didn’t lull you into submission with his sleeper hold, he forced you to crack under his infuriating mind games. And on top of all that, he was man enough to rock a kilt.

Piper continues to make sporadic appearances to this date, schooling today’s Superstars with his unique brand of crazy, and changing the questions just when the answers are becoming obvious.

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